Articles tagged with: Immigration

Introduction

on Wednesday, 27 April 2016. Posted in Issue 78 The Search for Refuge

PdfIconIntroduction

John Guiney SJ and Eugene Quinn

During 2015, in excess of one million refugees and migrants risked their lives in crossing the Mediterranean Sea to enter the European Union. More than 3,700 people, one quarter of them children, died by drowning during the attempt. Europe’s experience of increased forced migration is just one element of a global phenomenon of  escalating displacement of people, as a result of conflict, persecution, extreme poverty, and other human rights violations. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that there are now, worldwide, almost 60 million displaced persons, the highest number since World War II. 

Forced Migration: A Challenge for European Solidarity

on Wednesday, 14 May 2014. Posted in Issue 74 Issues for the New EU Parliament?, Poverty & Inequality, International Issues

migrationA boat carrying African asylum seekers and migrants in the Mediterranean Sea between Africa and Italy. © UNHCR/L. BoldriniThe carnage of asylum seekers and migrants making the perilous journey to a better life makes frequent headlines; thousands die every year in the Mediterranean alone. Far too little is done to mitigate the risks such migrants face. Poverty, vulnerability and war are rife in our times, but compassion is in short supply.1

The Refugee Convention Sixty Years On: Relevant or Redundant?

on Thursday, 15 December 2011. Posted in Issue 68 After the Housing Bubble, International Issues, Housing Policy

Introduction
Sixty years ago the international community agreed a framework for the protection of refugees, when a diplomatic conference in Geneva adopted the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees. Today, the protection of those compelled to leave their own state, and seek asylum in another, continues to present formidable challenges. The scale of those challenges, and the perceived inadequacies of the Refugee Convention’s response to them, have led some critics to argue that the Convention is now outdated, unworkable and irrelevant.1

 

Working Notes Issue 65 Editorial

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Working Notes Issue 65 Editorial

Who are the ‘vulnerable’ in Ireland today? There has been a lot of talk about ‘protecting the vulnerable’ in the lead up to the recent Budget. So many vested interests, politicians, trade unions and others now appropriate the word it begins to lose its sense of meaning. Yet within our society there are clearly people who are vulnerable, whose needs are not represented, whose concerns are urgent and whose voices are not heard.

Living in Direct Provision: Resident Voices

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Elizabeth O'Rourke

December 2010

Living in Direct Provision: Resident Voices

Asylum seeking women receiving English language certificates - © JRS IrelandIntroduction
2010 marks the tenth anniversary of the introduction of the policies of Direct Provision and Dispersal.

Direct provision is a scheme for individuals and families seeking asylum or other forms of protection, which provides accommodation on a full board basis and aims to directly provide all basic daily needs of asylum applicants. Dispersal is a policy whereby asylum applicants, after an initial short stay in Dublin to process their asylum application, are sent to one of 51 state provided accommodation centres located throughout 19 counties. While awaiting a decision on their asylum claim applicants are not eligible for child benefit, do not have a right to work and have limited education rights.

The World Mobilised: The Jesuit Response to Refugees*

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Mark Raper SJ

December 2010

The World Mobilised: The Jesuit Response to Refugees

Refugee camp, Ogujebe, Uganda - © JRS International*This article is adapted from the first Annual Pedro Arrupe SJ Lecture hosted jointly by Jesuit Refugee Service and ISIRC (Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies of Religions and Cultures, Pontifical Gregorian University).

Introduction
Three core insights came together for Fr Pedro Arrupe SJ when he launched Jesuit Refugee Service 30 years ago this week. The first compelling factor was his compassion for the refugees in their suffering. He wrote to the Society on 14 November 1980 ‘…last year, struck and shocked by the plight of thousands of boat people and refugees, I felt it my duty…,’. For Arrupe the refugees were ‘signs of the times’, a feature of his historic time that compelled a compassionate response. Second, having been Superior General already for 18 years, he had a strategic sense of how the Society worked and what it was capable of: its mission, structure and strengths. Third, Pedro Arrupe had confidence in the goodwill and resourcefulness of the many partners willing to share in the same mission – ‘the active collaboration of many lay people who work with us’.

Bridging the Protection Gap: Immigration Detention and Forced Migrant Destitution

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Philip Amaral

December 2010

Bridging the Protection Gap: Immigration Detention and Forced Migrant Destitution

Destitute Migrant in European capital - © JRS EuropeIntroduction
Asylum and migration has been at the forefront of European Union policymaking for many years, but especially so during the last decade. The gradual enlargement of the Union and the disappearance of internal borders has obliged national governments and EU institutions to fundamentally re-think how refugees and migrants are welcomed into European society. Indeed, these factors have led to a legal restructuring with EU-wide implications.

‘Frontloading’: The Case for Legal Resources at the Early Stages of the Asylum Process

on Wednesday, 18 November 2009. Posted in Issue 62 Who Will Pay for Recession?

Elizabeth O’Rourke

November, 2009

pdf icon‘Frontloading’: The Case for Legal Resources at the Early Stages of the Asylum Process 

Introduction

In 1992, fewer than fifty people came to Ireland seeking asylum. From 1995, however, there was a rapid increase in the numbers applying for asylum, reaching a peak of 11,634 in 2002. Following the Citizenship Referendum of 2004 and subsequent legislative changes, and consistent with underlying trends internationally, the number of asylum applications fell significantly. By 2008, applications had declined to a total of 3,866 for the year, representing a 2.9 per cent decrease on the total of 3,985 in 2007, and a 200 per cent reduction on the 2002 figure.1

Temporary Agency Work: Labour Leasing or Temping?

on Wednesday, 29 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?

Brendan MacPartlin SJ
November 2008

pdf Temporary Agency Work: Labour Leasing or Temping?

agency.jpg

Protesting in support of Irish Ferry workers

© D. Speirs

Introduction

 

The word ‘temping’conjures up an era when young secretarial workers moved from assignment to assignment, almost like a rite of passage, until it was time to take up a desirable employment opportunity and settle down. Nowadays, people in skilled occupations such as nursing and information technology often avail of the services of temping agencies as a way ‘to see the world’.

 

Hidden Children: the Story of State Care for Separated Children

on Wednesday, 29 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?

Maria Corbett

November 2008

Please Let Us Stay campaign

Young people involved in the P+L+U+S

(Please Let Us Stay) campaign

© D. Speirs

pdf Hidden Children: the Story of State Care for Separated Children

Introduction

 

During the past ten years, over 5,300 children have come to the attention of the authorities in Ireland, having arrived here without the company of either of their parents. Many of these children, referred to as ‘separated children’ or ‘unaccompanied minors’, have experienced war and violence; some have been trafficked or smuggled into Ireland. They come from a wide range of countries, including Nigeria, Somalia, Ghana, Angola, Rwanda, China and parts of the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

 

The Immigration, Residence and Protection Bill 2008: Well-Founded Fears?

on Wednesday, 29 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?, 2008

Eugene Quinn
November 2008

 

Right to Stay Campaign

Right to stay, right to work campaign

© D. Speirs

pdf The Immigration, Residence and Protection Bill 2008: Well-Founded Fears?

Context

 

The Immigration, Residence and Protection Bill 2008 has come before the Dáil at a time when there has been a significant reduction in the number of new asylum claims being made in Ireland. In line with European trends, applications have dropped from a peak of 11,634 in 2002 to fewer than 4,000 in 2007.


Announcing the publication of the Bill on 29 January 2008, the then Minister for Justice, Equality and Law Reform, Brian Lenihan TD, said:

 

Migration

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May 2007

pdf Migration 61.83 Kb


Introduction
In its report, Migration in an Interconnected World, the Global Commission on International Migration noted:

Integration: A Challenge in Principle, in Policy and in Practice

on Monday, 05 February 2007. Posted in Issue 54 Immigration and Integration: Realities and Challenges, 2007

February 2007

Eugene Quinn is National Director of the Jesuit Refugee Service (Ireland)
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Introduction
The economic boom of the Celtic Tiger years has transformed Ireland from a country of origin into a country of destination. Sustained and stellar economic growth from the early 1990s not only persuaded thousands of Irish nationals to return but attracted non Irish national migrant workers in large numbers. They were responding to the recruitment efforts of Irish employers who, faced with the significant skill and labour shortages that were a consequence of the boom, began to look overseas to fill vacancies.

Trafficking and the Irish Sex Industry

on Monday, 05 February 2007. Posted in Issue 54 Immigration and Integration: Realities and Challenges, 2007


Cathy Molloy is a Research Officer with the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice
February, 2007

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‘These stories are horrific. They made us really angry that this could be happening in our country.’ ‘We are not going to stop until the legislation is changed.’ (The Carlow Nationalist, 19 May 2005 quoting Catriona Kelly a then Transition Year student at St. Leo’s College.)

At the Young Social Innovator of the Year Awards 2005, the Transition Year class of St Leo’s – founded by the Sisters of Mercy in 1839 – won the Global Citizenship Award. Their project, ‘Stop the Trafficking of Women into Ireland for Sexual Exploitation’, was inspired by stories of young girls and women whose experiences were so shocking that they could not be ignored.

Ireland’s Asylum System – Still a Shambles?

on Monday, 05 February 2007. Posted in Issue 54 Immigration and Integration: Realities and Challenges, 2007

February 2007

Peter O’Mahony

Introduction
Having worked overseas for more than ten years, I returned to live in Ireland in 1997. In the years during which I was away, both the pace and the scale of change in this country were significant; over the subsequent decade, however, they have been even more dramatic.

Nowhere has this been more evident than in the area of migration. Ireland, long seen internationally as a country of huge emigration, with, a mere generation ago, outflows in some years of more than 50,000 people, is now a country of substantial inward migration, both forced and voluntary.

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We tend to think that law defines what crime is. This makes sense because contemporary legal codes are concerned with marking out the territory where conduct is permissible by specifying the conduct that is outlawed. Yet the earliest bodies of law – consider for example, the Torah or Hammurabi’s Code – are at least as committed to articulating the good as proscribing the bad... Read full editorial

Working Notes is a journal published by the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice. The journal focuses on social, economic and theological analysis of Irish society. It has been produced since 1987.