Articles tagged with: International

Integrating Perspectives on Christmas

on Thursday, 18 December 2003. Posted in Issue 47 Budget 2004: Preserving a Divided Society?, 2003

December 2003

by Nadette Foley, Zhyan Sharif and Egide Dhala

Nadette: Christmas is a time for home coming. In many different parts of the world people make enormous efforts, and travel long distances, to spend Christmas-time with their families, even if only for a few days.  But just as in the past thousands of the Irish people who emigrated to North America, Australia or Britain, had to spend their Christmases away from home, so also many of the people who have come to Ireland in recent years as migrant workers, as refugees and especially as asylum seekers, do not have the option of going home for Christmas.  Returning may not be possible because they cannot afford the money, or the time, or if they leave they will not be re-admitted or the conditions in their home country make going back dangerous.

Integration: What's Done? A Lot More to Do

Written by Eugene Quinn on Tuesday, 01 April 2003. Posted in Issue 44 Ireland: Facing up to a Multicultural Future?, 2002

Ireland: A transition to multi-ethnic society

 

In the last ten years Ireland has experienced dramatic changes that have transformed the political, economic and cultural landscape. The Celtic Tiger years have brought hitherto unknown wealth and prosperity. They also turned the tide of emigration. Ireland for the first period in its history experienced substantial immigration. This was not simply a flow of returning emigrants. Between 1996 and 2001 around 80,000 migrant workers were issued with visas and permits to service the labour demands of a booming economy. There was a dramatic rise in the number of asylum seekers from a mere 39 applications in 1992 to in excess of 10,000 in 2001.

Wanted: An Immigration Policy

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 33 Wanted: An Immigration Policy, 1998

Bill Toner, SJ

December 1998

Introduction

A couple of years ago the London-based Independent on Sunday published a feature about the attractiveness of Ireland to many retired English couples. It seems that many retired English people have discovered that in their old age they are better off in Ireland than in England. Free travel is a considerable attraction and many of them are entitled to medical cards, which provides them with a better service than they would get from the N.H.S. They have the same entitlement to non-contributory pensions as Irish citizens.

The Economics of Immigration Policy

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 33 Wanted: An Immigration Policy, 1998

Tom Giblin, SJ

December 1998

 

The possible impact of immigration on the economy of a country is much debated. In continental Europe, up to a decade ago, the impact of immigrant labour was not a matter of much concern. Immigrant workers were widely employed to carry out work for which it was very difficult to recruit native workers. For instance, in Germany large numbers of Turkish people were employed in this way. In recent times however, with unemployment levels high over most of Europe, there has been more concern about the impact of immigration on the economy. Because of increased immigration here, there is now some concern in Ireland about the issue.

Immigration: More Than Just Numbers

on Thursday, 31 July 2003. Posted in Issue 36 Cherishing our Old Folk, 1999

Tony O\'Riordan, SJ

December 1999

The recent trend of immigration

Much of the focus on immigration has been as a result of the growing number of asylum seekers arriving in Ireland in recent years. However the recent trend of immigration in Ireland shows that apart from asylum seekers there are a considerable number of immigrants each year. (see Table 1). In fact even with the increase in asylum seekers there are 10 times more immigrants arriving in Ireland than those seeking asylum.

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As a society, Ireland puts effort into remembering. Orchestrated campaigns have been launched for the “decade of commemorations,” as we mark the centenary of the decisive events, from the 1913 Lock-out to the cessation of the Civil War in 1923, that established modern Ireland. Yet right in the middle of that period, in 2018, we reach the landmark ten years since the end of the Celtic Tiger.’ Read full editorial

Working Notes is a journal published by the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice. The journal focuses on social, economic and theological analysis of Irish society. It has been produced since 1987.