Articles tagged with: International

Working Notes Issue 65 Editorial

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Working Notes Issue 65 Editorial

Who are the ‘vulnerable’ in Ireland today? There has been a lot of talk about ‘protecting the vulnerable’ in the lead up to the recent Budget. So many vested interests, politicians, trade unions and others now appropriate the word it begins to lose its sense of meaning. Yet within our society there are clearly people who are vulnerable, whose needs are not represented, whose concerns are urgent and whose voices are not heard.

Living in Direct Provision: Resident Voices

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Elizabeth O'Rourke

December 2010

Living in Direct Provision: Resident Voices

Asylum seeking women receiving English language certificates - © JRS IrelandIntroduction
2010 marks the tenth anniversary of the introduction of the policies of Direct Provision and Dispersal.

Direct provision is a scheme for individuals and families seeking asylum or other forms of protection, which provides accommodation on a full board basis and aims to directly provide all basic daily needs of asylum applicants. Dispersal is a policy whereby asylum applicants, after an initial short stay in Dublin to process their asylum application, are sent to one of 51 state provided accommodation centres located throughout 19 counties. While awaiting a decision on their asylum claim applicants are not eligible for child benefit, do not have a right to work and have limited education rights.

The World Mobilised: The Jesuit Response to Refugees*

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Mark Raper SJ

December 2010

The World Mobilised: The Jesuit Response to Refugees

Refugee camp, Ogujebe, Uganda - © JRS International*This article is adapted from the first Annual Pedro Arrupe SJ Lecture hosted jointly by Jesuit Refugee Service and ISIRC (Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies of Religions and Cultures, Pontifical Gregorian University).

Introduction
Three core insights came together for Fr Pedro Arrupe SJ when he launched Jesuit Refugee Service 30 years ago this week. The first compelling factor was his compassion for the refugees in their suffering. He wrote to the Society on 14 November 1980 ‘…last year, struck and shocked by the plight of thousands of boat people and refugees, I felt it my duty…,’. For Arrupe the refugees were ‘signs of the times’, a feature of his historic time that compelled a compassionate response. Second, having been Superior General already for 18 years, he had a strategic sense of how the Society worked and what it was capable of: its mission, structure and strengths. Third, Pedro Arrupe had confidence in the goodwill and resourcefulness of the many partners willing to share in the same mission – ‘the active collaboration of many lay people who work with us’.

Bridging the Protection Gap: Immigration Detention and Forced Migrant Destitution

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Philip Amaral

December 2010

Bridging the Protection Gap: Immigration Detention and Forced Migrant Destitution

Destitute Migrant in European capital - © JRS EuropeIntroduction
Asylum and migration has been at the forefront of European Union policymaking for many years, but especially so during the last decade. The gradual enlargement of the Union and the disappearance of internal borders has obliged national governments and EU institutions to fundamentally re-think how refugees and migrants are welcomed into European society. Indeed, these factors have led to a legal restructuring with EU-wide implications.

‘Frontloading’: The Case for Legal Resources at the Early Stages of the Asylum Process

on Wednesday, 18 November 2009. Posted in Issue 62 Who Will Pay for Recession?

Elizabeth O’Rourke

November, 2009

pdf icon‘Frontloading’: The Case for Legal Resources at the Early Stages of the Asylum Process 

Introduction

In 1992, fewer than fifty people came to Ireland seeking asylum. From 1995, however, there was a rapid increase in the numbers applying for asylum, reaching a peak of 11,634 in 2002. Following the Citizenship Referendum of 2004 and subsequent legislative changes, and consistent with underlying trends internationally, the number of asylum applications fell significantly. By 2008, applications had declined to a total of 3,866 for the year, representing a 2.9 per cent decrease on the total of 3,985 in 2007, and a 200 per cent reduction on the 2002 figure.1

Europe: What is Pope Benedict Thinking?

on Friday, 28 August 2009. Posted in Issue 61 Perspectives on Europe

James Corkery SJ

September, 2009

Europe: What is Pope Benedict Thinking?

It may seem strange, as Ireland prepares for its second vote on the Lisbon Treaty on October 2, 2009, to focus on the vision of Europe of the current pope. After all, are his views not essentially religious and are Ireland’s concerns with Lisbon not, in the main, economic, social and political? At first glance, this may appear to be the case, but on closer inspection it becomes evident that Irish people are concerned about a very wide range of issues with which the Treaty of Lisbon is, or is perceived to be, connected. And the pope is concerned, as he observes the growth and development of the European Union, with the principles and the vision of humanity that underlie the advance of the EU and with how these are related to the religious and cultural heritage of the continent of Europe as a whole. Popes, and not only the present one, have a pastoral interest in Europe – and thus in the values, freedoms, opportunities, possibilities and challenges that it presents to its peoples. Indeed, before homing in on Benedict XVI’s vision of Europe, it will be instructive to glance back at the approach to Europe taken by his predecessor, John Paul II, who dominated the papal scene for over a quarter of a century, from 1978 to 2005.

Ireland, Europe and Catholic Social Teaching: Shared Values?

on Friday, 28 August 2009. Posted in Issue 61 Perspectives on Europe

Cathy Molloy

September, 2009

Ireland, Europe and Catholic Social Teaching: Shared Values?

Climate Change

© iStock
No Irish in EU?

In May this year, on the last stretch of the ancient pilgrim route to Santiago de Compostela in Spain, etched on a large stone, for all to see, were the words ‘No Irish in EU’. The pilgrim route celebrates St James the Apostle and has been walked by Christians for well over a thousand years, and by Kerrymen since the 1400s!1 Given the history of Irish Christianity, and its importance in the founding of Europe from the 6th century, it shocks to realise that in 2009 there are people who do not want us in the European Union.

Taking Our Rightful Place Ireland, the Lisbon Treaty and Democracy

on Friday, 28 August 2009. Posted in Issue 61 Perspectives on Europe

Edmond Grace SJ

September , 2009

Taking Our Rightful Place: Ireland, the Lisbon Treaty and Democracy

Bureacracy in Europe

Bureacracy in Europe
© iStock

A Basis of Right

The Irish electorate has voted in favour of many European treaties since the original treaty of accession in 1971. Until the Nice Treaty any deal struck by Irish negotiators with their European partners included generous financial incentives. These incentives are indisputable and easily grasped. They have been our point of entry into Europe up till now and no other vision has been offered by our political leaders, who now have left it too late to redeem their failure of leadership. They have appealed too often and too eagerly to narrow self-interest and, as a result, they have lost the ability to inspire any generous sentiment.

The time has come for straight-forward if unfamiliar questions. What is this entity, the European Union? How have we Irish benefited from membership? What are we willing to contribute? And why?

From LIBERTAS to CARITAS

on Friday, 28 August 2009. Posted in Issue 61 Perspectives on Europe

Brendan MacPartlin SJ

September, 2009

From LIBERTAS to CARITAS

Temporary agency workers protesting

Temporary agency workers protesting.
© D. Speirs

Euro barometer surveys consistently show that Irish people have a positive attitude towards the European Union. Research on how people voted in the referendum on the Lisbon Treaty found that this positive attitude was the strongest single factor affecting people’s voting decisions.1 It also found that a low level of knowledge of what was in the treaty had a powerful effect on increasing the ‘no’ vote. People who perceived things to be in the treaty that are not there, tended to vote no.  On the other hand, people who had a correct perception of what was in the treaty tended to vote yes. So it is a good move for the Department of Foreign Affairs to publish its excellent White Paper2 even though devotees of The Sun and News of the World may not read it.3

Towards the Lisbon Treaty Referendum: The View from Europe

on Friday, 28 August 2009. Posted in Issue 61 Perspectives on Europe

Frank Turner SJ

September, 2009

The title proposed to me implies a double focus: actually, a double double focus. If the rest of this edition of Working Notes offers perspectives on Europe, my task is to discuss perspectives from Europe. Two doublets are implicit in the title:

  • ‘The view’: but whose view? The view of the political establishment in Brussels? (There is no single view, but a whole set of overlapping or contrasting views.) Or rather the view of a Jesuit organisation, or of the author?
  • ‘The view’ – but of what? Of the merits and demerits of the Treaty of Lisbon itself? Or of the process of the Irish Referendum I (lost), through the subsequent inter-governmental negotiations to secure national concessions in view of Referendum II on October 2nd?

 

Working Notes Issue 61 Editorial

on Friday, 28 August 2009. Posted in Issue 61 Perspectives on Europe

September, 2009

Editorial

With the Referendum on the Lisbon Treaty just weeks away the build-up has been gathering momentum. Various civil society groups including those comprising some of our best known arts and sports celebrities, farmers, lawyers, ‘women for Europe’ have publicised their support for a Yes vote. Whatever the outcome of the vote on October 2nd, it seems reasonable to suppose that we know more than we did last time. Voting Yes or No cannot be reasonably based on the claimed ignorance of the content of the Treaty. This edition of Working Notes presents various perspectives on Europe, – not solely on the Treaty – with emphasis on some of the less publicised underlying values.

Temporary Agency Work: Labour Leasing or Temping?

on Wednesday, 29 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?

Brendan MacPartlin SJ
November 2008

pdf Temporary Agency Work: Labour Leasing or Temping?

agency.jpg

Protesting in support of Irish Ferry workers

© D. Speirs

Introduction

 

The word ‘temping’conjures up an era when young secretarial workers moved from assignment to assignment, almost like a rite of passage, until it was time to take up a desirable employment opportunity and settle down. Nowadays, people in skilled occupations such as nursing and information technology often avail of the services of temping agencies as a way ‘to see the world’.

 

Hidden Children: the Story of State Care for Separated Children

on Wednesday, 29 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?

Maria Corbett

November 2008

Please Let Us Stay campaign

Young people involved in the P+L+U+S

(Please Let Us Stay) campaign

© D. Speirs

pdf Hidden Children: the Story of State Care for Separated Children

Introduction

 

During the past ten years, over 5,300 children have come to the attention of the authorities in Ireland, having arrived here without the company of either of their parents. Many of these children, referred to as ‘separated children’ or ‘unaccompanied minors’, have experienced war and violence; some have been trafficked or smuggled into Ireland. They come from a wide range of countries, including Nigeria, Somalia, Ghana, Angola, Rwanda, China and parts of the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

 

The Immigration, Residence and Protection Bill 2008: Well-Founded Fears?

on Wednesday, 29 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?, 2008

Eugene Quinn
November 2008

 

Right to Stay Campaign

Right to stay, right to work campaign

© D. Speirs

pdf The Immigration, Residence and Protection Bill 2008: Well-Founded Fears?

Context

 

The Immigration, Residence and Protection Bill 2008 has come before the Dáil at a time when there has been a significant reduction in the number of new asylum claims being made in Ireland. In line with European trends, applications have dropped from a peak of 11,634 in 2002 to fewer than 4,000 in 2007.


Announcing the publication of the Bill on 29 January 2008, the then Minister for Justice, Equality and Law Reform, Brian Lenihan TD, said:

 

Migration

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May 2007

pdf Migration 61.83 Kb


Introduction
In its report, Migration in an Interconnected World, the Global Commission on International Migration noted:

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In February 2016, the Jesuit Secretariat for Social Justice and Ecology and for Higher Education in Rome published a Special Report on Justice in the Global Economy. The Report was compiled by an international group of Jesuits and lay colleagues in the fields of social science and economics, philosophy and theology. This issue of Working Notes is a response to the Report. Read full editorial

Working Notes is a journal published by the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice. The journal focuses on social, economic and theological analysis of Irish society in the areas of . It has been produced three times a year since 1987, and all of the articles are available in full on this site. Read More..