Penal Policy

Psychology and the Penal System

on Wednesday, 12 March 2014. Posted in Issue 73 The Rights of Workers – Then and Now, Penal Policy

Mountjoy

Mountjoy Prison                        © D. Speirs

Paul O'Mahony

Introduction

In this article, I intend to look back and draw contrasts between the current situation of Irish prisons and what prevailed when I joined the prison service, as one of the group of four psychologists, newly employed in 1980.

Focus Ireland Prison In-Reach Service

on Friday, 12 October 2012. Posted in Issue 70 Prison Policy Matters , Penal Policy

 

Introduction

On any given day in Ireland, prison doors open and men and women step out into the daylight. But what happens to them when those heavy doors close behind them? The bleak truth for a great number is that they have no home to go to and nobody to welcome them upon their release. Many will be back inside prison within a year.

Transforming Healthcare in Irish Prisons

on Friday, 12 October 2012. Posted in Issue 70 Prison Policy Matters , Penal Policy

 

Introduction

There are fourteen prisons across the Republic of Ireland, catering mainly for men but also women (who represent around 3.5 per cent of the prison population) and young offenders. Most of these prisons are high security facilities – there are only two open prisons in the State, which cater for just over 5 per cent of prisoners. The most recent annual report of the Irish Prison Service shows that 17,318 people were committed to prison in 2011, an increase of 0.8 per cent on the 2010 total of 17,179.1

 

Exploring the Policy Process: The Genesis of the Dóchas Centre

on Friday, 12 October 2012. Posted in Issue 70 Prison Policy Matters , Penal Policy

 

Introduction

What might good prison policy look like in practice? In an article in The Guardian in May 2012, Halden Prison in Norway, which opened in 2010, was described as 'the most humane prison in the world'.1 Yet the prison is, in fact, a high-security jail accommodating about 250 prisoners found guilty of the most serious offences, including murder, manslaughter, and sex offences.