Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?

Is Expansion of Prison Places for Women Needed? An Analysis of Statistics, 2003–2006

on Thursday, 30 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?

Daragh McGreal and Tony O’Riordan SJ
November 2008

pdf Is Expansion of Prison Places for Women Needed? An Analysis of Statistics, 2003-2006

Introduction

Current government prison policy envisages the closure of the Dóchas Centre in Mountjoy and the opening of new women’s prisons at Thornton Hall, in north Dublin and at Kilworth, Co. Cork, resulting in a doubling of the number of places for women prisoners. This radical expansion of prison capacity for female offenders is being justified by the authorities on the grounds that the existing facilities at Dóchas and in Limerick Prison are routinely overcrowded and that the prison building programme being undertaken at present needs to be ‘future proofed’ to cater for an on-going increase in the female prison population.

 

Temporary Agency Work: Labour Leasing or Temping?

on Wednesday, 29 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?

Brendan MacPartlin SJ
November 2008

pdf Temporary Agency Work: Labour Leasing or Temping?

agency.jpg

Protesting in support of Irish Ferry workers

© D. Speirs

Introduction

 

The word ‘temping’conjures up an era when young secretarial workers moved from assignment to assignment, almost like a rite of passage, until it was time to take up a desirable employment opportunity and settle down. Nowadays, people in skilled occupations such as nursing and information technology often avail of the services of temping agencies as a way ‘to see the world’.

 

Hidden Children: the Story of State Care for Separated Children

on Wednesday, 29 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?

Maria Corbett

November 2008

Please Let Us Stay campaign

Young people involved in the P+L+U+S

(Please Let Us Stay) campaign

© D. Speirs

pdf Hidden Children: the Story of State Care for Separated Children

Introduction

 

During the past ten years, over 5,300 children have come to the attention of the authorities in Ireland, having arrived here without the company of either of their parents. Many of these children, referred to as ‘separated children’ or ‘unaccompanied minors’, have experienced war and violence; some have been trafficked or smuggled into Ireland. They come from a wide range of countries, including Nigeria, Somalia, Ghana, Angola, Rwanda, China and parts of the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

 

The Immigration, Residence and Protection Bill 2008: Well-Founded Fears?

on Wednesday, 29 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?, 2008

Eugene Quinn
November 2008

 

Right to Stay Campaign

Right to stay, right to work campaign

© D. Speirs

pdf The Immigration, Residence and Protection Bill 2008: Well-Founded Fears?

Context

 

The Immigration, Residence and Protection Bill 2008 has come before the Dáil at a time when there has been a significant reduction in the number of new asylum claims being made in Ireland. In line with European trends, applications have dropped from a peak of 11,634 in 2002 to fewer than 4,000 in 2007.


Announcing the publication of the Bill on 29 January 2008, the then Minister for Justice, Equality and Law Reform, Brian Lenihan TD, said:

 

Justice in Recession: Statement on the Current Economic Situation

on Wednesday, 29 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?

Justice in Recession: Statement on the Current Economic Situation

November 2008

Introduction

 

It is no exaggeration to say that people in Ireland are in a state of shock at the suddenness and severity of the downturn in the country’s economic situation. In so far as we thought about ‘Ireland after the Celtic Tiger’, most people assumed it would be a time where growth would be slower, but more sustainable, where there would be ‘a soft landing’ for house prices, and where the gains of the boom years would be consolidated. We did not envisage an economic recession, a deep and widespread crisis in the financial system, a sharp rise in unemployment, and considerable anxiety about the future.

 

Working Notes Issue 59 Editorial

on Wednesday, 29 October 2008. Posted in Issue 59 In Recession who will be left Stranded?

November 2008

pdf Editorial

‘The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there’, L.P. Hartley famously wrote. Right now in Ireland, however, it is the present that feels like a foreign country. This is a place where we must adjust our assumptions and expectations and learn, or relearn, the skills to enable us deal with an economic situation that is the reverse of the favourable one to which we had become so acclimatised.

 

In February 2016, the Jesuit Secretariat for Social Justice and Ecology and for Higher Education in Rome published a Special Report on Justice in the Global Economy. The Report was compiled by an international group of Jesuits and lay colleagues in the fields of social science and economics, philosophy and theology. This issue of Working Notes is a response to the Report. Read full editorial

Working Notes is a journal published by the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice. The journal focuses on social, economic and theological analysis of Irish society in the areas of . It has been produced three times a year since 1987, and all of the articles are available in full on this site. Read More..