1998

Do Poor Children Deserve Perfect Teeth?

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 31 Do Poor Children Deserve Perfect Teeth?, 1998

Bill Toner, SJ

March 1998

Introduction

The current debate about the availability of free orthodontic treatment for children may seem a fairly trivial issue, compared with other problems facing our society. Yet it raises serious questions about our values, our priorities and our standards. Basically the background to this issue is that throughout the western world people are setting themselves ever more exacting standards in regard to personal appearance. Due to increased resources and new medical technology, \'blemishes\' which are accepted by one generation as a fact of life become less socially acceptable. Many conditions which are often \'corrected\' nowadays (such as eye squint, birthmark and hare-lip) were not always attended to in the past. For older people who can afford them there are a whole range of cosmetic \'improvements\' available, such as \'face-lifts\', hair replacement, silicon implants in breasts and so on. Currently there is a particular focus is on teeth. It appears that today\'s image-makers have decided that straight even teeth, with no gaps, should be the norm. This new standard is probably much influenced by American television, particularly soaps like Friends and Baywatch.

The Dependency Culture: A Good or a Bad Thing?

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 32 The 'Dependency Culture': A Good or a Bad Thing?, 1998

Bill Toner, SJ

July 1998

Introduction

The other day I listened to a middle-class woman sounding off about the \'dependency culture\'. She complained in particular about people who "did not need to go out to work" because they were surviving very well on unemployment assistance or lone parent allowance, rent allowance, back-to-school allowances, medical card and so on. She resented the fact that these benefits were partly funded from her own income tax payments

Wanted: An Immigration Policy

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 33 Wanted: An Immigration Policy, 1998

Bill Toner, SJ

December 1998

Introduction

A couple of years ago the London-based Independent on Sunday published a feature about the attractiveness of Ireland to many retired English couples. It seems that many retired English people have discovered that in their old age they are better off in Ireland than in England. Free travel is a considerable attraction and many of them are entitled to medical cards, which provides them with a better service than they would get from the N.H.S. They have the same entitlement to non-contributory pensions as Irish citizens.

The Economics of Immigration Policy

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 33 Wanted: An Immigration Policy, 1998

Tom Giblin, SJ

December 1998

 

The possible impact of immigration on the economy of a country is much debated. In continental Europe, up to a decade ago, the impact of immigrant labour was not a matter of much concern. Immigrant workers were widely employed to carry out work for which it was very difficult to recruit native workers. For instance, in Germany large numbers of Turkish people were employed in this way. In recent times however, with unemployment levels high over most of Europe, there has been more concern about the impact of immigration on the economy. Because of increased immigration here, there is now some concern in Ireland about the issue.

Housing Associations in Ireland: Present and Future

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 32 The 'Dependency Culture': A Good or a Bad Thing?, 1998

Introduction

Housing is once again top of the political agenda. No political party in a country with 80% home ownership can afford to ignore the difficulties currently experienced by those wishing to buy a house. However, the current situation is indicative of greater changes within the housing sector.

Traditionally one either owned one\'s house or one rented from the local authority or from a private landlord. Now many households part-buy part-rent under shared ownership schemes and there has been a large increase in rented accommodation. While many new options have become available, the current high prices of housing, both for rent and purchase, has resulted in more people being unable to fund their own accommodation.

Government Report to the U.N. Committee on the Rights of the Child

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 31 Do Poor Children Deserve Perfect Teeth?, 1998

Fr Peter McVerry, SJ

March, 1998

 

Ireland\'s first national report on the state of children\'s rights and protections to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the child was presented by Liz O\'Donnell T.D., Minister of State for Development Assistance and Human Rights on the 12th and 13th January. Following her statement to the Committee, the Minister was grilled by the members of the Committee who had been well briefed by several NGOs who were also present, including the Children\'s Rights Alliance. The Children\'s Rights Alliance has been very critical of Government inaction on children\'s rights and needs and expressed to the Committee their criticisms. It is only a coincidence, of course, that the night before they met the Committee, they received a cheque from the government for £100,000 towards their valuable work!

Crime: Causes and Responses

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 31 Do Poor Children Deserve Perfect Teeth?, 1998

Bill Toner, SJ and Tom Giblin, SJ

March, 1998

 

Why Did Gavin Do It?

Gavin, a twenty-one year old who normally lives in a flat complex in the inner city, is currently serving a one year sentence for burglary. On temporary release for Christmas, he is persuaded by a young neighbour to join him in a stolen car. The two drive out to the suburbs, where they spend some time in high-speed \'joy-riding\' and then ram-raid an off-licence and steal spirits and cigarettes. On the way home they are followed by a police car, which they ram. They are arrested and Gavin arrives back in prison, where he will face further charges.

Care In Chaos

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 32 The 'Dependency Culture': A Good or a Bad Thing?, 1998

Fr Tony O'Riordan, SJ

July, 1998

 

Introduction

Prisoners aged under 21 make up about 33% of the prison population as against the EU average of 10%. In fact on 15 January 1998 there were 730 offenders between the ages of 15 and 21 in custody. Even more disturbing is the fact that 43% of those committed to St. Patrick\'s Institution have already served at least one previous sentence. Given this high level of repeat offending it is questionable if the prison system is achieving its objectives of rehabilitation and re-socialisation, as well as those of security and safe custody.

Drugs: The Current State of Play

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 33 Wanted: An Immigration Policy, 1998

Frank Brady, SJ

December 1998

 

Introduction

In October 1996 and May 1997 the Ministerial Task Force on Measures to Reduce the Demand for Drugs published its first and second reports. The first report deals mainly with heroin and the problem of opiate misuse in the Greater Dublin area. The second deals with the non-opiate problem nation-wide, with drugs in prisons, and, briefly, with therapeutic communities and rehabilitation.

In February 2016, the Jesuit Secretariat for Social Justice and Ecology and for Higher Education in Rome published a Special Report on Justice in the Global Economy. The Report was compiled by an international group of Jesuits and lay colleagues in the fields of social science and economics, philosophy and theology. This issue of Working Notes is a response to the Report. Read full editorial

Working Notes is a journal published by the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice. The journal focuses on social, economic and theological analysis of Irish society in the areas of . It has been produced three times a year since 1987, and all of the articles are available in full on this site. Read More..