Issue 52 Mental Illness in Irish Prisons: A Solitary Experience?

Still Waiting for Housing

on Friday, 21 April 2006. Posted in Issue 52 Mental Illness in Irish Prisons: A Solitary Experience?, 2006

Peter McVerry SJ
April 2006

 

Housing Need

The findings of the Local Authority Assessments of Social Housing Needs, carried out in March 2005, were released by the Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government in December 2005.1

The figures show a reduction in housing waiting lists of 9.8% from the previous assessments in 2002 (Table 1).2

Mental Illness in Irish Prisons:

on Friday, 21 April 2006. Posted in Issue 52 Mental Illness in Irish Prisons: A Solitary Experience?, 2006

Eugene Quinn

April, 2006

Health Care Standards in Irish Prisons
In June 2004, the Irish Prison Service published a statement of Health Care Standards, covering the care of those detained in Irish prisons and places of detention. The core aims of the Standards are stated as being: "to provide prisoners with access to the same quality and range of instruments to which they would be eligible within the general community" and to give priority to the promotion of the health of prisoners.1  
These aims accord with Article 12 of the International Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) which recognises "the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health". Ireland has ratified the ICESCR, which under international law obliges the State to ensure that the rights enshrined in the Covenant are guaranteed for all persons in its territory.

Working Notes Issue 52 Editorial

on Friday, 21 April 2006. Posted in Issue 52 Mental Illness in Irish Prisons: A Solitary Experience?, 2006

April 2006

The Report of the Expert Group on Mental Health Policy, A Vision for Change, was published in January 2006. In his introduction, Tim O\'Malley TD, Minister of State with special responsibility for mental health, states that the Report is intended to set out "a comprehensive policy framework for our mental health services for the next 7-10 years".

Doing Business and Doing Good: The Role of Business Ethics

on Tuesday, 18 April 2006. Posted in Issue 52 Mental Illness in Irish Prisons: A Solitary Experience?, 2006

Seamus Murphy, SJ

April 2006

 

Down the ages, some currents of thought have seen business as incapable of being honourable, and barely able to be honest, since honest business will always be at a disadvantage in competition with dishonest business.  On this view, neither business, banking, investment, profit-making, nor entrepreneurial initiative promote the good of individuals or society.  Business ethics is doomed to be at best ineffectual, at worst a sham.

When Ireland became an independent State it inherited some appallingly bad housing conditions. This was most notoriously the case in the severely deprived areas of inner-city Dublin, but inadequate and overcrowded housing which lacked basic facilities was also prevalent in towns and villages and rural areas around the country. Read full editorial

Working Notes is a journal published by the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice. The journal focuses on social, economic and theological analysis of Irish society. It has been produced since 1987.